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Polio and the Syrian Crisis

Polio and the Syrian Crisis

In the past couple months there has been a news spotlight on the Polio outbreak taking place in Syria and Iraq, an outbreak some have dubbed “the most challenging in history,” but why the challenge? It would seem any populace, despite whatever political or idealogical differences may be present, would have the common goal of eliminating catastrophic disease from the pool. Yet as conflict rages, both in Syria and Iraq, Polio continues to creep upon the population. The Syrian government has been accused of refusing aid to civilians in rebel held cities, aid that could make the difference for starving and infected individuals uninvolved with the conflict, yet Assad’s forces wish to use this as a siege tool, effectively crushing the opposition forces by allowing innocents to die with no access to food, medical aid, and sometimes even fresh water. Villages in Iraq, Afghanistan, and Pakistan controlled by militant forces also have a difficult time obtaining international aid as well due to the negative stigma that comes with foreign involvement, particularly in Middle Eastern nations with colonization history. So Polio rages, big deal? If this outbreak cannot be dealt with properly, and soon, generations of Iraqis, Syrians, and even more nations, could face a polio bug greater than man has had to battle since the 1900’s. Below I’ve included multiple organizations who are working to stifle this outbreak despite threats from government forces such as Assad’s in Syria, to militant groups such as Al-Qaeda in Iraq. Please take a moment to visit their pages. -Shivite12

Doctors Without Borders

UNHCR

UNICEF

Save The Children

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Happy April Readers!

Happy April Readers!

Hey readers, it’s been a hectic month of March on the international stage, and thus I’d like to welcome April with warm regards in the hopes things cool down amongst our fellow human beings. Pleased to see UnfoldedOP growing at a healthy pace since its start at the beginning of the month, and looking forward to more contributing Authors beginning this April! In march we watched another year of the crisis in Syria pass by, witnessed a separation of a nation with Ukraine’s Crimean territory, but most of all we paid attention and plugged into the world around us. It is only when we turn a blind eye to the plight of man that we abandon our humanity. When you turn on a computer the news is avoidable during your browsing, and I’d like to thank our readers for being brave and not turning away from the information by visiting this page and others. We’ve started a dialogue about it, now let’s take the next step and get into the month of April wanting to make some change in the world. -Shivite12

Shameful Performances

Shameful Performances

Yesterday, Crimean citizens voted in a landslide 95% majority, to secede from Ukraine and align itself with its previous ruling power, Russia. This particular piece of democratic action has been at the center of the global stage since protests climaxed in Ukraine in January. Since then events have continued to escalate, almost setting off a bloody conflict between Russia and Ukraine amidst a myriad of provocations. The Ukrainian government, however, was wildly put off by the secession, and like the United States, Japan, and other western powers refuses to recognize the democratic(that some would argue corrupt) process that took place in this southern coastal region. I find myself haunted by many questions in the aftermath of the vote, with two in particular unable to leave me be. The first is for Vladamir Putin of Moscow’s leadership, I ask: With all the protests outside the Kremlin, and the economic sanctions placed on you by the U.S. and the E.U., was it all worth it? I speculate you miscalculated and now sit with an entire caribou kicking and screaming on your plate rather than the delicious flank you were awaiting. Eat up. And a question for the desk of POTUS, Barack Obama, Is military dominance in the world worth running to the rescue of every European country that experiences strife? And on top of that is it worth our international reputation to turn all red in the face with Russia when our international rhetoric is already filled with lies and double standards(I.e. Russia violates Ukrainian sovereignty, which we proceed condemn, yet we violated Iraq’s among others)? Hypocrisy rarely benefits the international community. -Shivite12

Whatever Happened to the Personal Bubble?

 

Eye-blue

All right readers, so what’s the deal with the NSA? In the name of precaution and security of the Nation, the National Security Agency (NSA) has stored millions of Internet and cellphone users’ data, along with monitoring phone calls and various other media activities of those it considers a threat to the safety of the nation. However, in defending their actions the NSA claims that their purpose is justified in the name of detecting foreign and domestic threats. While I concede weapons of mass destruction and terrorism are things I believe we all prefer were kept at bay, it is blasphemous to assert that tabs need be kept on close to a hundred percent of the Internet using population. The NSA’s existence stems from the signing into law of the USA-PATRIOT Act, which declared many invasions of citizens privacy constitutional, ranging from wire taps to invasions of homes and businesses in “sneak and peek” searches. When examining the act it is transparent that “the broad scope and full impact of the act’s provisions did not come to light until after it’s signing,” as stated by Andrew Walter in a review of the homeland security situation. In a haste to protect the borders of our nation from attack in face of a successful one on September 11th, we failed to foresee the results of the sacrifices to privacy that would be made in the name of security in the nation. How do we secure our privacy? At this years South by Southwest(SXSW) Tech festival multiple topics were discussed amongst Ben Wizner and Chris Soghoian of the ACLU, and their guest of honor Edward Snowden. Particularly, the point that mass surveillance can “become too expensive,” and this can be achieved through open ended encryption being provided by websites big and small, and putting security first when designing new apps, computer programs, etc. -Shivite12

Link to ACLU video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UIhS9aB-qgU

3 Years

3 Years

Let us not forget as this three year anniversary of the Syrian tragedy comes around. Over 100,000 have perished in this conflict. Countless have been displaced and fled into neighboring countries as the conflict continues to tear the country asunder. In the west we often put countries in the Middle East and their conflicts out of our minds, yet the people are no different than us. Let’s not allow this conflict to pass into 2015. -Shivite12

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